30 6 / 2014

free as a bird

30 6 / 2014

14 12 / 2013

i

(Source: Spotify)

07 12 / 2013

yes

yes

(Source: crazydiamond-mr)

01 12 / 2013

"

it’s so hard to make decisions that will affect my life & future in so many ways. I’m about to embark on a new journey, a whole new chapter, very new beginnings. graduating from college is a huge milestone & probably one of the hardest, yet most rewarding, adventures I have ever accomplished. it was the best 5.5 years of my life! looking back, I’ve made so many beautiful, lifelong friendships, dealt with pain & the loss of good friends, had many beautiful relationships I’ve learned so much from, experienced more live music that opened my eyes & introduced me to the best people on earth, drove to Murfreesboro 10 thousand times, gone on so many road trips to the most amazing places with the most amazing people, experienced so many music festivals I can’t even begin to count, blessed with the most amazing, supportive family it’s hard to believe actually exists…. it’s been a rollercoaster. I’ve learned so much about myself; I’ve grown as a person & have changed for the better. I’ve learned so much in school. I am so grateful that I chose to study what I have studied. Sociology has allowed me to gain a whole new perspective of the world & the people in it; Media, History & Culture has allowed me to learn about the history of the country we live in & new media that consumes our lives; & Recording Industry has opened my eyes up to the the world I want to work in. I am able to graduate from a university with no student loans & zero debt, which I am extremely thankful for. throughout college, I have nannied for the best families, with the most imaginative children who teach me new things everyday.

I am ready for this new chapter in my life. I’m ready to embrace new challenges & be a grown up. I want to make the people who surround my life proud. I love the life I have. thank you, friends. I don’t know where I would be without some of you. xo

"

my heart

01 12 / 2013

"I have always loved everything about you. Even what I didn’t understand."

Albert Camus (via rlyrlyugly)

(Source: theunquotables, via sadgirlsanonymous)

25 11 / 2013

it’s snowing!!!!

25 11 / 2013

coolchicksfromhistory:

Nanyehi (Nancy Ward)
Art by Ericka Lugo (website)
Nanyehi was a Beloved Woman or Ghigau of the Cherokee.  This status gave her a lifelong seat on the Council of Women which elected a representative to the Council of Chiefs.  The women also held specific powers within Cherokee society, such as the right to determine how prisoners were treated. 
Nanyehi earned this honor as a teenage wife and mother when she accompanied her husband during the Battle of Taliwa against the Creeks.   She is said to have chewed her husband’s bullets so that their jagged edges would create more damage.  When her husband was killed in battle, Nanyehi rallied the Cherokee and led them to victory. 
Briefly married to a white man after her first husband’s death, Nanyehi favored friendly relations with white settlers.  Although the Cherokee as a group sided with the British in the American Revolution, Nanyehi secretly passed information to the Continental Army, perhaps an attempt to uphold goodwill with the group she believed would eventually triumph.  Nanyehi also rescued a white female captive, Lydia Russell Bean, from death.  Lydia went on to teach the Cherokee women dairy production and weaving.  This changed the lives of Cherokee women who up until this point had been farmers as planting now became the men’s job so that women could produce cloth and raise cattle.
After the Revolutionary War, Nanyehi became an ambassador between the Cherokee and the Americans.  She was a spokesperson for peace at a 1781 meeting between Cherokee and US representatives. 

Nanyehi spent her last years as in innkeeper in Tennessee.  She died in either 1822 or 1824, before the Cherokee were forced to leave their lands by the Indian Removal Act of 1830 and the Trail of Tears.  

coolchicksfromhistory:

Nanyehi (Nancy Ward)

Art by Ericka Lugo (website)

Nanyehi was a Beloved Woman or Ghigau of the Cherokee.  This status gave her a lifelong seat on the Council of Women which elected a representative to the Council of Chiefs.  The women also held specific powers within Cherokee society, such as the right to determine how prisoners were treated. 

Nanyehi earned this honor as a teenage wife and mother when she accompanied her husband during the Battle of Taliwa against the Creeks.   She is said to have chewed her husband’s bullets so that their jagged edges would create more damage.  When her husband was killed in battle, Nanyehi rallied the Cherokee and led them to victory. 

Briefly married to a white man after her first husband’s death, Nanyehi favored friendly relations with white settlers.  Although the Cherokee as a group sided with the British in the American Revolution, Nanyehi secretly passed information to the Continental Army, perhaps an attempt to uphold goodwill with the group she believed would eventually triumph.  Nanyehi also rescued a white female captive, Lydia Russell Bean, from death.  Lydia went on to teach the Cherokee women dairy production and weaving.  This changed the lives of Cherokee women who up until this point had been farmers as planting now became the men’s job so that women could produce cloth and raise cattle.

After the Revolutionary War, Nanyehi became an ambassador between the Cherokee and the Americans.  She was a spokesperson for peace at a 1781 meeting between Cherokee and US representatives. 

Nanyehi spent her last years as in innkeeper in Tennessee.  She died in either 1822 or 1824, before the Cherokee were forced to leave their lands by the Indian Removal Act of 1830 and the Trail of Tears.  

25 11 / 2013

pretty much my life

pretty much my life

(Source: Flickr / nikkimelody, via officiallylittlemissnorthwest)

25 11 / 2013